Greenburgh Afterschool Program

We had a blast collaborating with the RJB school @greenburghcsd and @greenburgh_pba and the PO’s who volunteered their time to create an after school program! We are happy to lead the way in the community. Thank you for choosing us! Thank you for trusting us with a wonderful group of children...

New York City Marathon – My Journey

Running the New York City Marathon in 2021. Follow my journey from shoulder and arm surgery to running the 2021 New York City Marathon. A Special Thank You to my surgeon Dr. Michael Gott for stitching me back together and to my Physical Therapist, Rami Said for bringing back the range of motion into my arm to enable me to run. Runners Peter Belmar, Thomas Schleicher, Cong Huang, Jake Sanchez, Euina...

Lucia Rijker

"If I really go within, find my strength, there's nothing that can stop me" - Lucia Rijker. Our newest mural of Lucia Rijker one of the greatest female fighters of all time. Design by Lucy...

Award-winning engineer helping to create the future

BY MATT WALL   Natasha Carpenter, an award-winning Vodafone engineer, reflects on how to attract more women in to the industry and shares her experiences of keeping the UK connected during the coronavirus pandemic. When Natasha Carpenter looks back 11 years to when she was a legal secretary, she can’t believe how far she has come in that time. Now she’s a winner of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Young Woman Engineer of the Year special recognition award, and also a recipient of a special recognition reward from Vodafone. As an experienced engineer specialising in fixed-lined telephony for commercial customers, she and her colleagues have been keeping UK businesses connected during the coronavirus pandemic. Young apprentice It was applying for a Cable & Wireless (now part of Vodafone) apprenticeship that changed her life. “I was just doing the same thing every day as a secretary, but this apprenticeship looked really interesting. I didn’t know anything about telecoms but I was interested in technology and how things worked,” she tells Vodafone UK News. Careers advice at her school in Essex pushed her towards office work, says Natasha, based on a sexist assumption that “girls didn’t really do this kind of stuff”. She admits that her line of work is still very male-dominated, which is why she’s so keen to spread the message – particularly to girls – that “no matter what you look like, your race, your gender, you can be an engineer if you want to”. I want to show people what the future could look like…it’s exciting! Initially, customers couldn’t believe she was the engineer when Natasha turned...